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Prescriptions

What is a repeat medication 

Repeat medications are medications that are for a specific condition and that you may have been on for some time. They are medications that appear on the white part of your prescription and will have a tick box next to them which indicates that you can reorder them. Repeat medications are issued in multiples of 28 which is in line with local Hertfordshire Medicines Management Policy. The practice will not issue more than two months of medication at a time, for some controlled medications the practice may consider issuing prescriptions for 7 days at a time.

What is an acute medication 

Acute medication is a medication that is usually given for a short course of treatment or as a one off i.e. antibiotics for an infection or a short course of pain relief. Acute medications do not appear on your repeat list. You would be expected to come and see a doctor each time you request them. Practice staff cannot issue acute medications, this has to be completed by a GP. 

Please note - medication requests cannot be taken over the telephone. Please do not ask members of staff at the practice to do this. 

Medication Review

Patients on repeat medication will be asked to see a doctor at least once a year to review their regular repeat medications and notification of a medication review should appear on your prescription. There are times that the practice may limit the amount of repeat medication you can have until you have attended for your review. A medication review does not take long to complete and means that you and the doctor can discuss any issues or benefits with the medication. 

In order to have a medication review please contact the practice and book an appointment with one of the doctors. 

Please allow two full working days for prescriptions to be processed and remember to take weekends and bank holidays into account.

 
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